PlanetJune Craft Blog

Latest news and updates from June

teal ribbed sweater

This is sweater #10 of my ‘learn to knit by making a dozen self-designed sweaters’ project. (Here are links to #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7 #8 and #9, if you’d like to see my progress.)

teal ribbed sweater

After the success of my most complex design yet, I thought I’d try something a bit simpler, and test out the quality of my notes from an earlier design that I’ve got a lot of use from: my green ribbed cardigan (#5).

I decided to make a pullover version, with just a couple of modifications: I added a couple of inches more length (the green one was slightly shorter than I’d have liked as I was working with the constraint of only having 4 balls of yarn!), adding a little more ease so the extra length wouldn’t be too tight over my hips, and modifying the positions of the rib stripes so the side seams would continue the stitch pattern flawlessly.

Other than that, and making a pullover with a single front instead of two half-fronts for the cardigan, I followed my previous notes exactly. I used the same yarn in a different shade and assumed my gauge would be the same (it was!) instead of swatching again.

teal ribbed sweater

To make the neckband, I again followed the style of my cardigan’s neckband. I overlapped the neckband at the point of the V instead of trying to make a mitred corner in pattern. Although it’s a little bulkier this way, it looks neat, and I stitched down the excess fabric on the inside so it doesn’t get in the way.

teal ribbed sweater

It’s good to know I can follow my own notes if I want to remake any of these sweaters, and it was refreshing to work from a pattern (of sorts) and not have to make design decisions and size calculations at every step.

But now I only need 2 more sweaters to complete this project (wow – I’m so close now!) so no more laziness; for the next sweater it’s time to tackle the one big design element I’ve never even tried to date: cables…

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Farmyard Goats crochet pattern

It’s here! My final commissioned pattern, Farmyard Goats, is now available to purchase!

Farmyard Goats amigurumi crochet pattern by PlanetJune

Farmyard Goats is a mix-and-match pattern that lets you choose the options you want, to make many different types of goat:

  • Ears – floppy, upright, or none?
  • Horns – long and curved, shorter, tiny nubs, or none?
  • Beard, or no beard?
  • Contrast-coloured horns and hooves, or not?

Farmyard Goats amigurumi crochet pattern by PlanetJune

You choose! Make any of my three pictured options in any colour(s), or assemble your own custom goat from all the included options – it’s up to you. 

Fun Fact: It can sometimes be tricky to tell a sheep from a goat, especially as some breeds of sheep are smooth-coated, and some goats are fluffy. Here’s the trick: if the tail points up, it’s a goat! Sheep tails always point downwards.

Meet the Goats

Farmyard Goats amigurumi crochet pattern by PlanetJune

My billy goat has upright ears, long horns, and a beard.

I invented a fun new technique to make the curved horns – it’s almost magical how it works, and yet it’s super-simple to achieve! I think you’ll enjoy it 🙂

To me, this is the definitive goat, but I know that’s not the case for many people, so I decided to include other options in the pattern, so you can make lots of different goats…

Farmyard Goats amigurumi crochet pattern by PlanetJune

My little kid goat has upright ears, short horn nubs, and no beard.

He’s a bit smaller than the other goats because, although I used the same pattern and hook size, I used mohair [goat!] blend yarn that was slightly finer than the worsted weight yarn recommended for the pattern, and 9mm eyes.

Farmyard Goats amigurumi crochet pattern by PlanetJune

My Nubian goat has floppy ears, no horns, and no beard.

But, of course, you can make a Nubian with any length horns and/or a beard, just by mixing and matching the pattern elements – this is a very versatile pattern 🙂

Ready to Crochet?

If you were one of the commissioners of this pattern, or had early access through the crochet-along, I hope you’ve been enjoying the pattern over the past few weeks!

If you’ve been waiting for the goat pattern, you can pick it up from my shop right now – and then join our Farmyard CAL in the PlanetJune Ravelry group 🙂

Or, if you’re not ready to buy just yet, please add my Farmyard Goats to your queue or favourites on Ravelry, so you don’t forget about it:

I hope you’ll enjoy my Farmyard Goats pattern! Which type of goat is your favourite?

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Tutorial: Attaching Legs Evenly on a Standing Amigurumi Animal

Stitching the various pieces of an amigurumi together is arguably one of the least enjoyable parts of amigurumi-making. I have a wealth of knowledge gleaned from making hundreds of amigurumi, and I’d like to share those tips with you, to make your amigurumi assembly less frustrating!

Today I’m going to share my tips on how to best attach the legs evenly on a standing 4-legged amigurumi animal, so the joins look neat and the animal can stand straight with all four feet touching the ground.

For more tips to make your amigurumi look even better, check out the new Perfect Finish category on my crochet tutorials page!


1. If They Touch, Pre-Join the Legs

Depending on how wide the legs are and how wide the body is, the legs may meet in the middle. Check your pattern’s cover photos to see if this applies, or test it out by positioning a pair of legs at the correct position beneath the body and seeing if the legs need to touch each other at the top to fit underneath the body.

Tip: If you place the legs too far apart, the feet will tend to splay outwards and the legs won’t support the body. That’s a look you’d probably like to avoid!

If Legs Don’t Meet:

amigurumi animals whose legs are separate at the point where they join the body (patterns by planetjune)
If there’s a space between the tops of the legs (as with the animals pictured above), skip down to Step 2, below.

If Legs Do Meet:

amigurumi animals whose legs touch at the point where they join the body (patterns by planetjune)

If you determine that the pair of legs will meet in the middle (as with the animals pictured above), you can stitch them together first, before attaching them to the body. This helps to attach them evenly and makes it easier to stitch the inner edge of the second leg to the body.

To do this, simply hold the pair of legs together, and stitch the tops together where they touch. (The number of stitches to attach will depend on the diameter of the legs.)

attaching legs evenly on a standing amigurumi animal

Repeat the check for the second pair of legs (remember, the body and leg shaping may mean that one pair of legs meet while the other doesn’t). If they do touch, stitch the pair of legs together as described above.

2. Attaching the First Pair of Legs

I prefer to stitch the front legs to the body first, as it’s easier to position them in relation to the head, to make sure the legs are centred beneath the body.

First, stitch just the middle of the joined pair of legs (or just the inner edge of each separate leg) to the underside of the body (below, left), making sure they are lined up with the head (or other means of recognising the top/bottom of the body).

Stop and check: is the middle of the pair of legs exactly at the bottom of the body (below, right)? If not, pull out your stitches, adjust the leg positions, and try again. Once they are centred, you’ll know that the pair of legs will be joined to the body symmetrically, without having had to pull out many stitches!

attaching legs evenly on a standing amigurumi animal

Next, move to each leg in turn and begin to stitch around the remainder of the open edge, using the Seamless Join technique (below, left). To create the smoothest join, when you reach the outer edge of the leg, try positioning your stitches onto the body slightly further out than usual, so the leg is stretched slightly as you pull each stitch tight.

When you’ve finished, the pair of legs should sit directly beneath the body (below, right).

attaching legs evenly on a standing amigurumi animal

3. Attaching the Second Pair of Legs

Move to the second pair of legs. Turn the animal upside down, and position the pair of back legs so their midpoint is in line with the midpoint of the front legs:

attaching legs evenly on a standing amigurumi animal

Again, stitch just the middle of the joined pair of legs (or just the inner edge of each separate leg, to the body, then pause and test the amigurumi to make sure the second pair is straight in relation to the first.

To do this, stand the amigurumi up on a flat surface and make sure both pairs of legs can sit squarely at the same time:

attaching legs evenly on a standing amigurumi animal

If the back legs are skewed slightly to one side or the other, only one back foot will be able to touch the ground. If this has happened, pull out your stitches, adjust the leg positions, and try again. Checking this now has just saved you from potentially having to undo all the stitches later!

As before, move to each leg in turn and begin to stitch around the remainder of the open edge, using the Seamless Join technique. To create the smoothest join, when you reach the outer edge of the leg, try positioning your stitches onto the body slightly further out than usual, so the leg is stretched slightly as you pull each stitch tight.


Congratulations! Now your amigurumi should have nice looking leg joins, and be able to stand stably on a flat surface, with the legs neatly beneath the body and all four feet making contact with the ground:

Farmyard Goats crochet pattern by PlanetJune

Give it a try on your next four-legged amigurumi and see if my technique makes the task a little less daunting for you! Let me know how it goes…


If you’re looking for my Farmyard Goats pattern, it’ll be going on general release in a couple of weeks. But if you join the Farmyard CAL in the PlanetJune Ravelry group, you can have exclusive early access to the pattern! See the Farmyard CAL thread in the group for full details 🙂

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Starfish Collection crochet pattern

Today I have a colourful new addition to add to my AquaAmi crochet pattern range: the Starfish Collection! These puffy starfish are a fast and easy no-sew pattern and look equally good as toys or home decor.

Starfish Collection crochet pattern by PlanetJune

Starfish Collection is a mix-and-match no-sew pattern that includes 4 sizes of sea stars, ranging from 3 to 7 inches (7.5 to 18cm) across:

Starfish Collection crochet pattern by PlanetJune
L-R: Tiny, Small, Medium and Large Starfish

You can make each size in any of three colour patterns (plain, striped top, and pale underside):

Starfish Collection crochet pattern by PlanetJune
Clockwise from top left: striped top, pale underside, plain underside, plain top

The pattern also includes options (for any size and style) for making a flat appliqué starfish, and amigurumi-style starfish with a cute happy face:

Starfish Collection crochet pattern by PlanetJune
Left: flat starfish appliqué; right: happy amigurumi starfish

About the Designs

These Starfish are fun to crochet – with no sewing needed (yay!), and the same basic technique for all the different sizes and options, once you’ve made one, you’ll find them very fast to work up.

Choose size, pattern, colour(s), flat or 3D, and whether it has a face – you can mix-and-match endlessly to make new combinations. Choose whites and pale neutrals to decorate your home with an elegant seaside vibe, or make colourful smiley toys (as they are made in one piece, they’re perfect baby-safe toys too, with embroidered or no features).

And that’s not all! Why not make a starfish Amigurumi Wall Hanging, or add a couple to a Turtle Beach blanket..?

Starfish Collection & Turtle Beach blanket crochet patterns by PlanetJune
Starfish on a Turtle Beach square

About the Pattern

Starfish Collection is a detailed pattern including written patterns, step-by-step photo tutorials, and right- and left-handed stitch diagrams for each size of starfish.

This is a modular pattern, so you can save paper and ink by reading all the background tutorial information on-screen and just printing the pages you need for the written instructions (p6-8) and stitch diagrams (right-handed p10-12; left-handed p14-16).

Buy Now & Launch Discount

Ready to start crocheting? You can pick up the entire Starfish Collection from my shop right now for only $5.50!

If you’re not ready to buy just yet (or even if you are!), please remember to heart and queue it on Ravelry:

But let’s make that deal even better: for one week only, I’ll give you an extra 10% off the price! To take advantage of this deal, add the Starfish Collection to your shopping cart, and enter the discount code SEASTAR at checkout! (Offer ends Wednesday 30 August, 2017.)

Starfish Collection crochet pattern by PlanetJune

I hope you’ll enjoy my new mix-and-match pattern – I can’t wait to see which size, colours and options you choose for your first starfish. (And if you don’t feel like mixing it up, please feel free to copy my sea stars exactly – that can be just as much fun!)

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The 5 Essential Techniques for Amigurumi

Amigurumi is a special subset of crochet that requires its own skills. Even the most experienced crocheters can be startled when they pick up their first amigurumi pattern and discover it’s full of new terms and techniques!

In this post, I’ll cover all the essentials you’ll need to be able to tackle an amigurumi pattern with confidence and end up with great-looking crocheted stuffed toys.

Note: All the posts linked below include both right- and left-handed video tutorials!


1. Magic Ring

The magic ring gives the perfect start to any piece of amigurumi: you can start crocheting in the round without any trace of a hole in the middle.

5 essential techniques for amigurumi: magic ring
L: magic ring; R: standard ‘chain 2’ start


2. Invisible Decrease

Decreasing without leaving any bumps or gaps sounds too good to be true, but the invisible decrease (abbreviated invdec) really does live up to its name!

5 essential techniques for amigurumi: invisible decrease (invdec)


3. Changing Colour

Changing colour correctly lets you make clean colour changes without dots of the wrong colour peeking through.

5 essential techniques for amigurumi: changing colour
Note: To manage your colour changes perfectly, you’ll also need to deal with the yarn you’re not currently using. My Managing the Yarns tutorial explains how!


4. Seamless Join

My Seamless Join technique creates a smooth, almost invisible join whenever you’re stitching an open-ended piece to a closed piece.

5 essential techniques for amigurumi: seamless join


5. Ultimate Finish

The Ultimate Finish is the equivalent of another magic ring at the end of your piece! Close up the remaining hole with a smooth, gap-free finish.

5 essential techniques for amigurumi: ultimate finish


Practice Makes Perfect!

Master these 5 techniques and you’ll be all set to conquer any amigurumi pattern and get a beautiful result!

PlanetJune pattern examples

Why not pick a favourite from my extensive nature-inspired PlanetJune pattern range and practice your skills?

PlanetJune pattern selection


Further reading:

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    June Gilbank

    Hi, I'm June. Welcome to my world of nature-inspired crochet and crafting. I hope you enjoy your visit!

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